Being Held, 2021
Fringe Projects Miami 
Acrylic paint on wall, The Carol Glassman Donaldson Child-Care Center 
Courtesy of the artist
 Being Held is a large-scale mural that depicts tender scenes of caregivers and children embracing each other. Rendered in rich colors and patterns, the project explores the artist’s interest in illustrating the fleeting moments that shape one's character. Painted to resemble a tapestry, the work is a nod to Afro-Caribbean and Southern traditions of pattern-making like the Gee’s Bend quilt makers from Alabama.  
Located across from the Miami-Dade Children’s Courthouse, Being Held’s primary audience are the passersby attending the juvenile and family cases held inside this civic building. The artist considers this work to be not only a memorial to the caregivers in our lives, but also intends for it to serve as a beacon of hope for the families confronting harsh realities within the court system. 
Being Held is a part of a public exhibition named PUBLIC COLOR which is organized by María Elena Ortiz in partnership with Deborah Di Capua of Fringe Projects. The exhibition is made possible with the support from John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs, Downtown Development Authority Miami, Miami Design District Miami, and The Ellies, Miami’s visual arts awards, presented by Oolite Arts.


Beach Day, 2021  

Acrylic paint on wall, 146 East Flagler Street

Courtesy of the artist  

Fleuridor’s mural recreates the memory of his nephew and niece going to the beach for the first time. In this work, he seeks to capture the thrill they experienced seeing the vastness of the ocean and playing in sand. The patterned bathing suits that the children wear are adorned with red hibiscus flowers and strawberry candies, which have special significance. The hibiscus flower is the national flower of Haiti, a reference to his family’s homeland. Strawberry candies were Fleuridor's favorite treat as a child. They are featured in the work to allude to the sweetness of the moment he is memorializing... Beach Day functions both as a depiction of sibling love and a public display of Black joy. 

Beach Day is a part of a public exhibition named PUBLIC COLOR which is organized by María Elena Ortiz in partnership with Deborah Di Capua of Fringe Projects. The exhibition is made possible with the support from John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs, Downtown Development Authority Miami, Miami Design District Miami, and The Ellies, Miami’s visual arts awards, presented by Oolite Arts.


All of Us, 2020

Haitian visual artists offer a meditation on liberation in this new public installation on the BAM sign, presented as part of DanceAfrica 2021. Inspired by Haiti’s legacy as one of the first independent nations in the Western Hemisphere, BAM Curator at Large Larry Ossei-Mensah invites these artists—and the Brooklyn community—to reflect on and draw strength from Haiti’s groundbreaking history in the midst of today’s calls for justice, equality, and liberation.

A Return: Liberation as Power features work by Delphine Desane, M. Florine Démosthène, Mark Fleuridor, Adler Guerrier, Kathia St. Hilare, and Didier William. The installation will be presented on the BAM sign at the corner of Lafayette and Flatbush Avenues.

Traversing Miami Beach’s boardwalk pathway between The Bass and Lincoln Road, Work from Home gathers the work of nine Miami-based artists exploring the complex and fluid notions of home from diverse entry points. Utilizing varying media, including photography, digital renderings, drawing and collage, the artists investigate personal, often private understandings of domestic life.

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